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Dougster

Poverty sucks!!!

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Dougster

It's no secret that the poor old Dougster lives and dies by his hideous poor man's budget. :o Right now I'm in a tough cash flow bind wherein I need to fuel both of my machines (they are both down to fumes!) but I don't have the spare funds to go buy another ~20 gallons of taxed, automotive-grade diesel fuel to fill them up. This is the premium undyed fuel I have been feeding my machines for at least the last 2-3 years... but to be honest, untaxed diesel fuel ain't any cheaper around here at the moment.

For sensitive family "political" reasons, I cannot borrow any more funds from the GW right now nor can I hit the IRA again for yet another "emergency distribution" without getting her ugly screaming mad at me. :frown:

And so my question is this: Am I risking anything horrible long-term by draining some heating oil out of one of our heating oil tanks and using it in the machines? And if I do this, is there any diesel additive I can use that would help or lessen any long-term risks?

I am not particularly worried about water nor crud in the oil as I can filter the heating oil quite well through my old heating oil transfer system.

I've read opinions both ways re: using home heating oil in modern tractor/equipment engines. I know the home heating oil will function. I just don't know if I am risking any long-term issues I'll come to regret somewhere down the road.

Sanity check please. Would you do this or not? :conf13:

Dougster

Edited by Dougster
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flman

I would do it, it is just dyed so that the tax man can bust truckers that might do it. For this time of the year it should be okay, but it is not winter grade.

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Dougster
I would do it, it is just dyed so that the tax man can bust truckers that might do it. For this time of the year it should be okay, but it is not winter grade.

The dye itself doesn't bother me. I just remember how my sailboat diesel used to run a whole lot better on fresh automotive grade diesel than on the crap we'd get occasionally down at the marina. :o

I haven't had any problems at all with either the tractor or Mini-Ex diesels (using automotive diesel or untaxed off-road diesel)... and I don't wish to start now. But tough times call for creative measures. Unless someone tells me otherwise, I think I'm gonna go for it. :o

Dougster

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TFF Admin

Home heating oil is #2 diesel fuel in most parts of the country with the exception of the northern states where Winter grade home heating oil aka #1 diesel aka kerosene is used.

DO NOT use Winter Grade home heating oil in your diesel unless you add a lubricating oil at 50 : 1. I use Walmart Supertech Marine 2 Stroke Lube Oil in the gallon container. You should add a good quality grade of fuel additive as well. Power Service Summer formula is a popular choice and found in most stores.

If using normal season grade home heating oil, you should be fine with a some Summer Formula Power Service fuel additive. I add Walmart Supertech Marine 2 Stroke Lube Oil to ALL of my diesel fuel just to ensure the injector pump and injectors get plenty of lubrication.

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Dougster
Home heating oil is #2 diesel fuel in most parts of the country with the exception of the northern states where Winter grade home heating oil aka #1 diesel aka kerosene is used.

DO NOT use Winter Grade home heating oil in your diesel unless you add a lubricating oil at 50 : 1. I use Walmart Supertech Marine 2 Stroke Lube Oil in the gallon container. You should add a good quality grade of fuel additive as well. Power Service Summer formula is a popular choice and found in most stores.

If using normal season grade home heating oil, you should be fine with a some Summer Formula Power Service fuel additive. I add Walmart Supertech Marine 2 Stroke Lube Oil to ALL of my diesel fuel just to ensure the injector pump and injectors get plenty of lubrication.

Thanks Randy! :greet24: Just the sort of input I was looking for! :happy34:

I'll have to ask whether or not our home heating oil supplier uses a winter grade oil as you describe it. I kinda doubt it, but it won't hurt to ask. Up in the Arctic Circle where the old Edster lives, that is probably essential... :04: ... but maybe not so much for Massachusetts.

I was just at the Walmart a few minutes ago reading the labels on the various diesel additives they sell. Selection wasn't great, but they had two different Power Service diesel additives, one for $5/quart and one for $7/quart. I don't recall either of them being a "summer additive" specifically. I'll try AutoZone and see what they sell. :happy34:

Dougster

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Edster

Nope nope nope---us northerners do not use #1 in the winter!!!!! We gets #2 all year long for heating oil. Only the folks with OUTSIDE oil tanks get a blend of #2 and #1 oil. Diesel fuel at the pumps is also cut with a bit of #1 in the winter to prevent gelling.

If I was in the same boat Doug I would tap the heating oil in the basement Ain't gonna hurt nuttin

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TFF Admin
Nope nope nope---us northerners do not use #1 in the winter!!!!! We gets #2 all year long for heating oil. Only the folks with OUTSIDE oil tanks get a blend of #2 and #1 oil. Diesel fuel at the pumps is also cut with a bit of #1 in the winter to prevent gelling.

If I was in the same boat Doug I would tap the heating oil in the basement Ain't gonna hurt nuttin

When I say Northern states, I am thinking upstate Maine or International Falls, Minn. States where it gets REALLY painful cold during the Winter.

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Dougster
If I was in the same boat Doug I would tap the heating oil in the basement Ain't gonna hurt nuttin

I'll put you down as a vote for the affirmative! :happy34:

When I say Northern states, I am thinking upstate Maine or International Falls, Minn. States where it gets REALLY painful cold during the Winter.
hmmmm 38 days of negative number temps in this part of Maine I call that friggin cold nuf

LOL!!!! :hilarious: :hilarious: :hilarious:

Unless Al Gore comes up with more of his "Global Warming", I'd say that the old Edster's place is plenty dang cold relative to us here in the PRM. :04:

Dougster

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Dougster
Oh now you step into my subject matter. :04::evilgrin10:

As for fuel additives you might want to peer over the scores of some of them.

http://articles.mopar1973man.com/general-cummins/36-fuel-system/68-hfrr-testing-of-common-diesel-fuel-additives

And here I thought that Linux was your main thang! :D:gy::greet24:Just kidding!

Can you give me the simplified dummy's guide to diesel additives? :confused2: What would be your top 3 picks for what I should add to my home heating oil to make it fully modern tractor/equipment diesel engine compatible? :confused2:

Dougster

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Mopar1973Man
And here I thought that Linux was your main thang! :D:gy::greet24: Just kidding!

Maybe you should call me some time and drink a beer with me on the phone you'll be surprised what I know. :evilgrin10:

Can you give me the simplified dummy's guide to diesel additives? :confused2: What would be your top 3 picks for what I should add to my home heating oil to make it fully modern tractor/equipment diesel engine compatible? :confused2:

Dougster

My personal favorite is good old fashion "2 Cycle Oil". Most all 2 cycle oil today is ashless and works perfect for lubricity in enhancer.

First off Bosch provides most all diesel fuel systems today. So now Bosch done their homework and testing fuel lubricity vs. fuel system parts.

bosch-testing.jpg

As you can see the "Borderline" is 450 HFRR score. Basically what the High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) does is submerge two test metals in fuel and the rub them together in a high frequency. The the wear scar is measured in microns. Hence the score. The better the lubricity of the diesel fuel the lower the HFRR number.

Before going any farther. Remember all diesel fuel has a score of roughly 520 HFRR here in the US. So now look above at the Bosch wear sheet and then look down at the damage it can cause.

So here is 650 HFRR look at the damage.

bosch-testing-cr-fail.jpg

Now with 400 HFRR fuel.

bosch-testing-cr-pass.jpg

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Dougster
Maybe you should call me some time and drink a beer with me on the phone you'll be surprised what I know. :evilgrin10:

My personal favorite is good old fashion "2 Cycle Oil". Most all 2 cycle oil today is ashless and works perfect for lubricity enhancer.

First off Bosch provides most all diesel fuel systems today. So now Bosch done their homework and testing fuel lubricity vs. fuel system parts.

As you can see the "Borderline" is 450 HFRR score. Basically what the High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) does is submerge two test metals in fuel and the rub them together in a high frequency. The the wear scar is measured in microns. Hence the score. The better the lubricity of the diesel fuel the lower the HFRR number.

Before going any farther. Remember all diesel fuel has a score of roughly 520 HFRR here in the US. So now look above at the Bosch wear sheet and then look down at the damage it can cause.

Okay, the poor old Dougster has studied your initial article further and some of it is starting to sink in. I "get" the idea of adding a "lubricity enhancer" to diesel engine fuel to extend engine component life. What surprises me in your article is that so many commercial products and alternative approaches appear to fail to provide any benefit at all. That, all by itself, is a bit troubling and confusing to me. :confused:

But first I have to ask the obvious question: The information you kindly provided me is all about treating standard untreated ULSD #2 diesel fuel to help extend engine life. Yet my present concern is all about temporarily using home heating oil in my tractor and mini-excavator. Are the issues presented by that exactly the same? Or not? :confused2:

Trying to think about this logically, I've been using automotive grade diesel fuel for the past 2-3 years (untaxed diesel before that), adding only a little Power Service before each winter mainly for gelling and starting performance concerns. So far, so good. No problems at all. Lubricity has not been something I've even thought about up until this thread. :conf5:

Now I am forced to use some home heating oil in the machines, probably for the rest of this year. So I am asking myself and the members: What, if anything, needs to be added to home heating oil to get me the same performance (ideally) as the automotive-grade diesel fuel that I've been using. :confused2:

Put another way: What is lacking in home heating oil (that is in automotive grade diesel fuel) that could have short- or long-term effects on my diesel engines? :conf5:

Is it the same question (with the same answer) or not? :conf13: The poor old Dougster is confused. :frown:

Dougster

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jsborn

Not sure about the frozen north but around here Home Heating oil come from the same holding tank that #2 Diesel comes from. It is the non-taxed tank you would draw from if you bought off-road fuel. I would and do use Power Service in the Gray bottle for most all my fuel requirements (truck & Tractor).

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Dougster
Not sure about the frozen north but around here Home Heating oil come from the same holding tank that #2 Diesel comes from. It is the non-taxed tank you would draw from if you bought off-road fuel. I would and do use Power Service in the Gray bottle for most all my fuel requirements (truck & Tractor).

At my last local supplier of untaxed diesel fuel, the diesel fuel tanks and the heating oil tanks were not the same... but that might have been for convenience and/or accounting purposes only. The separate tanks could have held exactly the same product for all I know. :conf5: That said, the price difference between untaxed diesel fuel and heating oil was rather substantial. :confused:

Dougster

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Mopar1973Man
Okay, the poor old Dougster has studied your initial article further and some of it is starting to sink in. I "get" the idea of adding a "lubricity enhancer" to diesel engine fuel to extend engine component life. What surprises me in your article is that so many commercial products and alternative approaches appear to fail to provide any benefit at all. That, all by itself, is a bit troubling and confusing to me. :confused:
I hate to say it but its to keep the big oil market rolling. Now if I play off of cetane number you see as cetane goes up the BTU's go down so that means 99% of all the products seen in the list are cetane booster. The only one that's not is 2 cycle oil which is a natural cetane reducer. As cetane gets lower the BTU's increase and the heavy knock is also reduced. But your working power is increased so for road vehicle there is a noted 2-3 MPG gain.

cetane-btu.jpg

But first I have to ask the obvious question: The information you kindly provided me is all about treating standard untreated ULSD #2 diesel fuel to help extend engine life. Yet my present concern is all about temporarily using home heating oil in my tractor and mini-excavator. Are the issues presented by that exactly the same? Or not? :confused2:
I don't think the heating oil is going to cause any harm to the engine in general but if the heating oil is not properly packaged with lubricant then fuel system wear will occur hence why I bought this subject up. It was back in 2005-2006 to force all fuel oils to start reducing sulfur content hence the lubricity started to fall and the standard created. For heating oil there is no requirement of lubricity but for your tractor their is so it more or less do you risk the thousand dollar injection system to cut corners with fuel?
Trying to think about this logically, I've been using automotive grade diesel fuel for the past 2-3 years (untaxed diesel before that), adding only a little Power Service before each winter mainly for gelling and starting performance concerns. So far, so good. No problems at all. Lubricity has not been something I've even thought about up until this thread. :conf5:
Little science for you. Take a small sample of power service and a small sample of 2 cycle oil and leave then in a open container for a few days. Tell me what happens to the power service and then tell me what happens to the 2 cycle oil.

I'm one of the few here with Dodge Ram truck Cummins power plant with a Bosch VP44 injection pump heading to 300k miles still turn out mid 20's for MPG's. I've even gone as far as getting junk pump to open it up to debunk Internet myths.

Here is what normal diesel fuel does to a injection pump timing piston. Remember this piston is HARDEN STEEL. :shocked3:

psi9x.jpg

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Dougster
I hate to say it but its to keep the big oil market rolling. Now if I play off of cetane number you see as cetane goes up the BTU's go down so that means 99% of all the products seen in the list are cetane booster. The only one that's not is 2 cycle oil which is a natural cetane reducer. As cetane gets lower the BTU's increase and the heavy knock is also reduced. But your working power is increased so for road vehicle there is a noted 2-3 MPG gain.

I don't think the heating oil is going to cause any harm to the engine in general but if the heating oil is not properly packaged with lubricant then fuel system wear will occur hence why I bought this subject up. It was back in 2005-2006 to force all fuel oils to start reducing sulfur content hence the lubricity started to fall and the standard created. For heating oil there is no requirement of lubricity but for your tractor there is so it more or less do you risk the thousand dollar injection system to cut corners with fuel?

Little science for you. Take a small sample of power service and a small sample of 2 cycle oil and leave then in a open container for a few days. Tell me what happens to the power service and then tell me what happens to the 2 cycle oil.

I'm one of the few here with Dodge Ram truck Cummins power plant with a Bosch VP44 injection pump heading to 300k miles still turn out mid 20's for MPG's. I've even gone as far as getting junk pump to open it up to debunk Internet myths.

Here is what normal diesel fuel does to a injection pump timing piston. Remember this piston is HARDEN STEEL. :shocked3:

You have obviously put a lot of time & effort into researching and studying this subject. :happy34: I appreciate you taking the time to educate me. :greet24: What you are saying makes perfect sense, although it still troubles me that so few commercial additives seem to make the grade. :conf5: I have a hard time just writing that off to big oil evilness and corporate greed, etc., especially when I read reviews that seem to suggest customer satisfaction. But that can be a topic for another day. Right now (today!) I am concerned about the part I highlighted in red bold.

The important point, if I am understanding it correctly, is that home heating oil (for which I sheepishly admit that I don't know the current sulfur content) has no requirement for lubricity whereas diesel engines need a certain level of lubricity for long-term well-being. Hence, I should add something to increase lubricity to at least the level found in commercial diesel fuel and, perhaps, something a bit beyond that. The only remaining question is how much lubricity enhancer to use on my home heating oil? :confused2: And is it possible (i.e., detrimental in any way) to use too much? :conf5:

But if I am reading you right, once I increase lubricity to an acceptable level, there is nothing more that I need to add to my home heating oil to use it safely in my tractor/equipment engines... correct? :confused:

Dougster

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Mickey

Good questions Doug and good answers Micheal. I read the article Michael pointed to several yrs back. Have been using a little 2-cyc oil in my tractor for quite some time. Since I've not had any problems I can't say either way for the benefits. I do suspect is does help.

May be off base here but it does cost something to remove the sulfur from the oil. Have a hard time thinking they'd go to the hassle to remove sulfur from the heating oil if they don't have to. But then I don't know what they put in to diesel fuel as an additive package. Sulfur may be higher in heating oil but is it missing anything important as a diesel fuel?????

Good discussion.

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Dougster
Good questions Doug and good answers Micheal. I read the article Michael pointed to several yrs back. Have been using a little 2-cyc oil in my tractor for quite some time. Since I've not had any problems I can't say either way for the benefits. I do suspect is does help.

May be off base here but it does cost something to remove the sulfur from the oil. Have a hard time thinking they'd go to the hassle to remove sulfur from the heating oil if they don't have to. But then I don't know what they put in to diesel fuel as an additive package. Sulfur may be higher in heating oil but is it missing anything important as a diesel fuel?????

Good discussion.

Well, the first fills using home heating oil are now in the tractor and mini-excavator tanks and all seems to be running well. :happy34: I did add some diesel fuel lubricant per the above comments. Won't say which one as I don't wish to start a membership pizzing contest but I think my choice will be adequate based on the info presented and what I managed to pickup on my own. :happy34:

Thanks to everyone for convincing me (teaching me!) what to do and why! :greet24: Special thanks to the MoparMan for the advanced education on diesel fuel lubricity. I really appreciate all the info presented! :happy34: :happy34: :happy34:

Dougster

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Mopar1973Man

Well years ago it was OK to use engine oil or waste engine oil as a fuel lubricant. That has past now being that most all engine oils now add soft metal like zinc and other things to promote better characteristics for the oil. Well with this occurring the ash content (the soft metals) is high now and a mess of ash is left on the injectors and the piston crowns.

dirty-inj.jpg

This is where my study on the 2 cycle oil started back in about 2006 and continued. Today's 2 cycle oil is ashless so this problem will not occur. Here is 85k miles of 2 cycle oil use...

injector-80k.jpg

As for using ATF like your father did way back when. That is no longer a answer either. ATF is now treated the same way with soft metal (ash again) also on top there is friction modifiers and anti-scorching compounds added. The anti-scorching compounds will retard the burn rate creating issues also the friction modifiers may create damage for the fuel system so ATF is no longer a viable answer any longer.

although it still troubles me that so few commercial additives seem to make the grade.
Most all products cover up a existing problem. Like if a injector cleaner is used I can promise you can take a injector out of the engine place it in 100% solution of cleaner and it will not clean the injector. The only way I found to clean a injector is to physically pull them out and one by one clean them by hand. So the injector cleaner is usually a naptha or solvent based additive that typically raises the HFRR score at the cost of "cleaning" your injectors which appears like it works because it runs better for that tank. Why? The Naptha (or solvents) covers for the poor spray pattern and increase ignition quality for that tank. Like I said before any kind of cetane booster is going to reduce the BTU content. Now I got to explain even more. Why is it that racing diesel run high cetane fuels like 53-55 cetane? This is because the engine is twisting at a very high rate of RPM and the fuel has to burn fast enough to be completely spent at the bottom of the power stroke. But now a daily driver or diesel tractor isn't running 4,000 or 5,000 RPM's racing the quarter mile. So you need a fuel that is burning slower pushing longer not a quick BANG... and that it. So you'll notice that with lower cetane the hard knock will quiet way down. The only time high cetane for us should be used is in the dead of winter with minus temps expected. Now with the colder cylinder temps you need the aid to promote the fuel ignition and the high cetane will do just that.

Now like I ask about the science experiment leaving two samples Power Service and 2 Cycle Oil. You'll find this is the answer. Power Service claims to have a lubricant in the product. Now if you leave a sample of it exposed to the air in a short time the cup will be a brownish color tar that is very sticky. But now 2 cycle oil will remain 2 cycle oil forever it never evaporates or changes. This is the point a fuel additive product claiming to have a lubricant should have a oil residue remaining. But most on that list will not. Now the part that evaporated is the cetane booster or injector cleaner. So there is your answer on why most don't cut the grade.

What injector cleaner won't do I do by hand...

May be off base here but it does cost something to remove the sulfur from the oil. Have a hard time thinking they'd go to the hassle to remove sulfur from the heating oil if they don't have to. But then I don't know what they put in to diesel fuel as an additive package. Sulfur may be higher in heating oil but is it missing anything important as a diesel fuel?????
Yes there is a reason the sulfur is removed its called EPA and CARB. Since burning either diesel fuel or heating oil is going to release the sulfur into the air creating acid rain so the EPA has been pushing to remove sulfur from diesel fuel, heating oil and even engine oil. Yes you new CJ-4 grade diesel engine oil is reduced sulfur content. Yes it does cost more to produce these products but it meets EPA standards.

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Dougster
Well years ago it was OK to use engine oil or waste engine oil as a fuel lubricant. That has past now being that most all engine oils now add soft metal like zinc and other things to promote better characteristics for the oil. Well with this occurring the ash content (the soft metals) is high now and a mess of ash is left on the injectors and the piston crowns.

This is where my study on the 2 cycle oil started back in about 2006 and continued. Today's 2 cycle oil is ashless so this problem will not occur.

So it's clear that you (and I guess Brother Mickey too) recommend 2-cycle oil as superior to any commercial diesel additive product. And the reason, if I got it right, is that you don't want any injector cleaners or cetane boosters diluting the pure lubricant. I think you are saying that the injector cleaners don't work anyway and the cetane boosters are only needed for winter operation (which is very rare in my case).

Let me ask you this: Have I been doing any harm to my diesel engines by using automotive-grade diesel fuel with presumably include these unnecessary/unwanted additives? :confused2: This is a practice I started long ago with my marine diesel... mainly because the fuel bought from the various marinas was so damned dirty. :frown: Now (before the present cash flow crisis), I use automotive-grade diesel simply because dyed off-road diesel isn't any cheaper and is farther away to obtain. :conf5:

While my Yanmar 20-something HP mini-excavator engine is quiet and smooth as silk all the time, I can't say the same for my Mahindra engine. It is a noisy devil. The nearby evil neighbors hate it when I use that machine! :04:

Could that diesel noise be worse because of the automotive-grade diesel I've been using? Or the Power Service that I add from time to time and before each winter? :confused2:

Now, you've got me wondering. :confused:

Dougster

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Mopar1973Man

:rolleyes10:

mainly because the fuel bought from the various marinas was so damned dirty.
If the fuel is dirty use a better filter. But let me ask how is pouring 400:1 ratio of a additive going to improve any thing? Lets look deeper. Power Service quotes a 400:1 ratio on the bottle my fuel tank is 35 gallons (multiply by 128) and its 4,480 ounces of fuel. So now divide by 400 (ratio) your going to add 11.2 ounces to the fuel of PS. Ok, So what is a 11.2 ounces going to do? It's like peeing in a pond nothing... The additive isn't going to remove the dirt/debris the filters will do that. Like on my truck I run dual filters my AirDog fuel system is 3 micron and then in the stock filter is a Fleetguard 10 micron. What so strange is after the 3 micron is the 10 micron and it still catching dirt. :shocked3:

Both filters after 30k miles. (Airdog is the larger and the cartridge is the stock Fleetguard.

2zeymj4.jpg

The reason I suggest the 2 cycle oil is a common thing here. I use it in 2 cycle engines (Weed eaters and chains saws). But actually the Opti-Lube is a better score and 2% Biodiesel is th best score of all. But again now considering the cetane of biodiesel being on average 50-55 cetane its not a good MPG fuel but is had the best HFRR score of 221. 2 Cycle oil at 128:1 is right at 380-420 HFRR on the unofficial testing I got from others.

Have I been doing any harm to my diesel engines by using automotive-grade diesel fuel with presumably include these unnecessary/unwanted additives?

Possibly. Some people are very precise about measuring and adding. Like myself I use to just pour a big ol' gulp of PS in the fuel tank of the Dodge truck. Needless to say my first injection pump failed at 48k miles under warranty. Since then I'm now at 233k miles on the clock (185k on the pump) on the second pump.

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TFF Admin

I am not a proponent of Power Service, just that it is what is readily available to most people. I personally use Amalgamated diesel fuel additive. They sell it by the 5 gallon jug. I bought one 5 gallon jug of the TDR-S formula (Summer formula)

http://amalgamatedinc.com/tdr-s.aspx

and a 5 gallon jug the TDR-WDA formula (Winter formula).

http://amalgamatedinc.com/tdr-wda.aspx

WOW!!! :shocked3: Have their prices gone up! I bought my two 5 gallon jugs for $250.04 but that was back in July of 2009. The actual cost back then was $100.25 plus $35 shipping but with combined shipping it was a bit cheaper.

I still use the Walmart Supertech 2 stroke lube oil. The only thing I have noticed about the 2 stroke oil is that it makes the engine run slightly quieter and makes my John Deere Yanmar engine smoke a good bit on start up until it is fully warmed up. It runs clean after that.

I think you will be fine with the heating oil and some 2 stroke lube oil. The fuel additive is not a absolute must or a cure all but I think a good quality fuel additive is just a bit more insurance against other issues that can occur.

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Dougster
If the fuel is dirty use a better filter.

My marine diesel had three fuel filters in a row... one big Racor and two engine mounted. The main (Racor) filter used to jam up so much, I should have bought stock in Racor. :mad: Going to the automotive-grade diesel (vs. marina fuel) cured that problem.

Possibly. Some people are very precise about measuring and adding. Like myself I use to just pour a big ol' gulp of PS in the fuel tank of the Dodge truck. Needless to say my first injection pump failed at 48k miles under warranty. Since then I'm now at 233k miles on the clock (185k on the pump) on the second pump.

So noted. Perhaps I am actually better off using home heating oil (with lube added) than using auto-grade diesel fuel. :conf5:

I am not a proponent of Power Service, just that it is what is readily available to most people. I personally use Amalgamated diesel fuel additive.

I never gave it much thought before now. :conf5: Strange that I could have been doing more harm than good. :shocked2:

I still use the Walmart Supertech 2 stroke lube oil. The only thing I have noticed about the 2 stroke oil is that it makes the engine run slightly quieter and makes my John Deere Yanmar engine smoke a good bit on start up until it is fully warmed up. It runs clean after that.

I am already noticing more visible smoke and odor on start-up and during large RPM changes up or down. Perhaps I overdid it on the lube a little? :confused2: No change in starting effort (it still starts very fast) and no change yet in noise level that I can tell.

I think you will be fine with the heating oil and some 2 stroke lube oil. The fuel additive is not a absolute must or a cure all but I think a good quality fuel additive is just a bit more insurance against other issues that can occur.

For whatever irrational reason, I'll still feel better using a commercial purpose-specific product vs. 2-cycle oil borrowed from my chains saws and weed wacker... so an Opti-Lube product (per MoparMan's score sheet) might be the best I can ever feel fully comfortable with. :gen17:

Emergency mid-winter operation, if ever necessary, could be an issue since I do not normally consume enough fuel (this year being an exception) to be "season specific" with additives. But for now, I've got enough other things to worry about. :gy:

Dougster

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Dougster
The only thing I have noticed about the 2 stroke oil is that it makes the engine run slightly quieter and makes my John Deere Yanmar engine smoke a good bit on start up until it is fully warmed up. It runs clean after that.
I am already noticing more visible smoke and odor on start-up and during large RPM changes up or down. Perhaps I overdid it on the lube a little? :confused2:

I think I may have spoken too soon. :o While the tractor seemed a little smoky and odorous on Monday, I specifically watched for it yesterday and not even a hint of smoke or odor even on cold starts and rapid speed changes. :conf5: So much for my keen powers of observation. :conf13:

Dougster

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